Sebastian N.

My feedback

  1. 8 votes
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    3 comments  ·  Core Server » Storage  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Sebastian N. commented  · 

    Why would you want to do that?

  2. 47 votes
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    5 comments  ·  Core Server » Management tools  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Sebastian N. commented  · 

    Have a look at the official documentation, it comes with all the scripts required to build a nano server: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt126167.aspx#Anchor_0

  3. 5 votes
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    2 comments  ·  Core Server » Installation and patching  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Sebastian N. supported this idea  · 
  4. 7 votes
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    1 comment  ·  Core Server  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Sebastian N. supported this idea  · 
  5. 1 vote
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    1 comment  ·  PowerShell » Other PowerShell  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Sebastian N. commented  · 

    What are you talking about? There's always the Get-Help cmdlet and the about_* pages as well as a Get-Command cmdlet that you can use to filter cmdlets by verb, noun, module, etc.

  6. 22 votes
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    5 comments  ·  PowerShell » Desired State Configuration (DSC)  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Sebastian N. commented  · 

    This is just not feasible. Yes, DSC and GPO overlap in some points yet they're entirely different approaches to system management:

    https://www.penflip.com/powershellorg/the-dsc-book/blob/master/dsc-overview-and-requirements.txt

    GPO/GPPs in particular differ from DSC in that they not only cover system management but also user management which DSC will never be able to achieve. Logon/Logoff triggers, OU links, WMI Filtering, Loopback processing, delegation, AD central store replication are just some of the things that you don't get with DSC.

  7. 3 votes
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    1 comment  ·  PowerShell » Desired State Configuration (DSC)  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Sebastian N. supported this idea  · 
    Sebastian N. commented  · 

    This request was originally brought up by me on the powershell.org forums and Don took the initiative to open a connect issue. I'd to discuss pros and cons of different implementations with you and the community.

    The original question was:

    What's the best way to handle maintenance windows when DSC is in use.

    Here's an example:
    Let's say I have a number of IIS machines and my DSC configs dictate that the IIS service should be always running.

    In our case our patchday/maintenance workflow requires us to disable various services on our servers prior to installing windows updates and they will only be enabled and started again when all updates have been installed successfully.

    And I responded to Don's connect issue with:

    If I understood the suggestion correctly it would stop the respective services every day if one only specified a start and stop time without a date, which is undesirable in my opinion.

    One would have to update the configuration with a date and start/stop time and regenerate the checksum prior to one's patch day and repeat those two steps for each patch day. Is that right?

  8. 24 votes
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    0 comments  ·  PowerShell » ISE and tooling  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Sebastian N. supported this idea  · 
  9. 30 votes
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    2 comments  ·  PowerShell » ISE and tooling  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Sebastian N. supported this idea  · 
    Sebastian N. commented  · 

    I agree, OGV should indeed output unmodified objects while allowing us to define what should be displayed by the cmdlet.

    One of my use cases is PowerCLI where I want to filter snapshots via OGV to pipe them to the Remove-Snapshot cmdlet. In order to see all of the snapshot properties that I want to filter by I need to use select-object prior to piping my snapshots to OGV. That causes the objects to change and loose their type information which makes the Remove-Snapshot cmdlet fails since the input objects from OGV don't match the expected snapshot objects that Get-Snapshot returns, e.g.:

    connect-viserver "myvcenterserver"
    $snapshots = Get-VM | Get-Snapshot
    $snapshots | select-object -properties "a","b","c" | Out-GridView -OutputMode Multiple | Remove-Snapshot -confirm:$false -runasync -verbose

    Being able to define a list of properties that should be shown by OGV while keeping the original object intact would be a great addition.

  10. 63 votes
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    1 comment  ·  PowerShell » ISE and tooling  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Sebastian N. supported this idea  · 
  11. 3 votes
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    1 comment  ·  PowerShell » PowerShell Engine  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Sebastian N. supported this idea  · 
    Sebastian N. commented  · 

    +1
    I'm able to reproduce this on Win10 Pro (version 10.0.10586)

    PS D:\> $PSVersionTable

    Name Value
    ---- -----
    PSVersion 5.0.10586.0
    PSCompatibleVersions {1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0...}
    BuildVersion 10.0.10586.0
    CLRVersion 4.0.30319.42000
    WSManStackVersion 3.0
    PSRemotingProtocolVersion 2.3
    SerializationVersion 1.1.0.1

  12. 7 votes
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    1 comment  ·  PowerShell » Desired State Configuration (DSC)  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Sebastian N. supported this idea  · 
  13. 2 votes
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    3 comments  ·  PowerShell » ISE and tooling  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Sebastian N. commented  · 

    I don't really understand the problem, please elaborate.

  14. 1 vote
    Sign in
    (thinking…)
    Sign in with: Facebook Google
    Signed in as (Sign out)

    We’ll send you updates on this idea

    2 comments  ·  PowerShell » Desired State Configuration (DSC)  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    investigating  ·  Mark Gray responded

    Thanks for the feedback!

    We will take this into consideration in a future release.

    MarkG

    Sebastian N. commented  · 

    I don't think that it as a good idea. The Service resource is meant to ensure that a service is in a specific state and not that a service exists. A file resource or script resource would be more appropriate for what you're trying to achieve.

1 2 4 Next →

Feedback and Knowledge Base