Casey Crockett

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  1. 2 votes
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    survey  ·  1 comment  ·  PowerShell » Documentation  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Casey Crockett supported this idea  · 
    Casey Crockett commented  · 

    It seems to be more about the -Include and -Exclude options and how they are working with the collection of items.
    Assuming there are directories, *.txt files, *.pdf files, and *.zip files in the current directory, the below command is returning nothing.
    Get-ChildItem -File -Exclude "*.zip", "*.pdf"
    If I take out the -File option, I get items returned with the exclude working, but directories are also included.
    It only seems to work as intended, as Douglas mentioned, if I directly specify the path with a wildcard like the below command.
    Get-ChildItem -Path "some directory\*" -File -Exclude "*.zip", "*.pdf"
    For me, the -Include option works the same wether I have the -File option or not. The below command returns nothing assuming the same current directory as above.
    Get-ChildItem -include "*.txt", "*.zip"
    Nothing is returned until I add the wildcard path. That is not very handy or intuitive.

    I'm on Win10 and $PSVersionTable output is below.
    Name Value
    ---- -----
    PSVersion 5.1.14393.1198
    PSEdition Desktop
    PSCompatibleVersions {1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0...}
    BuildVersion 10.0.14393.1198
    CLRVersion 4.0.30319.42000
    WSManStackVersion 3.0
    PSRemotingProtocolVersion 2.3
    SerializationVersion 1.1.0.1

  2. 13 votes
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    1 comment  ·  PowerShell » Other PowerShell  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Casey Crockett supported this idea  · 
  3. 39 votes
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    4 comments  ·  PowerShell » ISE and tooling  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Casey Crockett supported this idea  · 
  4. 47 votes
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    8 comments  ·  PowerShell » ISE and tooling  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Casey Crockett supported this idea  · 
  5. 56 votes
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    4 comments  ·  PowerShell » ISE and tooling  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Casey Crockett supported this idea  · 
  6. 58 votes
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    2 comments  ·  PowerShell » ISE and tooling  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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  7. 57 votes
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    5 comments  ·  PowerShell » ISE and tooling  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    This is a very difficult thing to implement, it could potentially break many of the add-ons, and could introduce some very confusing UI elements.

    That said, we’re interested to get more ideas from you for how something like this might work. Feel free to post your comments below.

    Thanks,
    Joey

    Casey Crockett commented  · 

    Maybe I'm not understanding an underlying issue here. Why not open a second ISE for the second monitor?
    And, I find it helpful to run a couple non-ISE Powershell consoles for one-off command runs and command and help lookups, but I don't see the benefit of separating the ISE console. I thought the benefit of the ISE was having the editor and console together.

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